Ted DeGrazia’s “Apache Collection”

Ted DeGrazia’s Original “Apache Collection” now in Superstition Mountain Museum’s Gallery

Ettore “Ted” DeGrazia (June 14, 1909 – September 17, 1982)

Ettore “Ted” DeGrazia (June 14, 1909 – September 17, 1982)

Lost Apache – Oil on canvas by Ted DeGrazia, painted in 1965

Lost Apache – Oil on canvas by Ted DeGrazia, painted in 1965

 

 

 

 

 

 

The traditional daily life of the Apache Indians and their elaborately costumed ceremonial Crown Dancers, Devil Dancers, and Eagle Dancers, were recurring sources of inspiration for famous Southwestern artist Ettore “Ted” DeGrazia (1909-1982).

Apache Camp - Large oil on canvas painted by DeGrazia in 1976.

Apache Camp – Large oil on canvas painted by DeGrazia in 1976.

The Superstition Mountain Lost Dutchman Museum is proud to announce that DeGrazia’s original “Apache Collection,” a retrospective of DeGrazia’s paintings depicting Native American Apaches, is currently on display in the museum exhibit hall and will be on loan from the DeGrazia Foundation throughout the 2015-2016 season. The collection consists of twenty-one oil paintings, five watercolors, and one large ceramic sculpture.

Glazed ceramic, by Ted DeGrazia in 1951, depicts an Apache Crown Dancer.

Glazed ceramic, by Ted DeGrazia in 1951, depicts an Apache Crown Dancer.

Twelve of the oils and two of the watercolors were featured in the 1976 book DeGrazia Paints the Apache Indians, and were on display both in 1976 and in early 2011. Most of the thirteen other pieces in the collection have never before been displayed. The “Apache Collection” spans three decades of the artist’s career (1947-1978) and illustrates his never-ending fascination with Arizona’s native peoples.

DeGrazia’s Superstition Gallery was located in the Superstition foothills near the museum from the 1975 until his death in 1982. DeGrazia, born in Morenci, AZ, was first introduced to the Superstition Mountains as a youth and never tired throughout his life of exploring and prospecting her hills and canyons.

From his many trips into the Superstition Mountains, to the controversial building of his gallery and home at the base of Superstition Mountain in 1974, to the dramatic 1976 inheritance tax protest he staged by burning 100 of his paintings in a pyre near Angel Springs in the interior of the mountains, many of DeGrazia’s most fanciful and infamous moments occurred within the Superstition Mountains.

The Superstition Gallery no longer exists, but through a cooperative agreement between the Superstition Mountain Museum and the DeGrazia Foundation’s Gallery in the Sun in Tucson, his work is still being exhibited and enjoyed by the thousands of visitors to this area he loved so much.

The Superstition Mountain Museum is located on a 15-acre site at 4087 N. Apache Trail (SR 88), just east of Apache Junction. It is open every day from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Admission for adults is $5, $4 for senior citizens over 55 and over, $2 students with ID, and children 17 and under are admitted free with an adult. Group tours are welcome; call ahead to schedule a guided group tour.